We need some problem and value statements before we start a conversation with our customer. It’s also useful to have some respected reference customers.

In order to articulate these effectively it’s worth practising our answers to these questions.

1 What customers are we working with that our potential clients respect?
2a What problems does our company solve? What are the likely implications of those problems?
2b What problems do we solve as individuals? What are the likely implications of those problems?
3a What solutions does our company offer? What is the likely value of those solutions?
3b What solutions do we offer as individuals? What is the likely value of those solutions?

As mentioned previously it’s worth separating problems and solutions. Many customers are only interested in listening to solutions when they’ve decided that the underlying problem has a real negative impact and is worth solving.

And at this stage they’ll then most probably want to look at a range of solutions, so they are in a position to choose the best one.

Brainstorm as large a list of the above as possible, then use the most important to help us gain access to the clients that interest us the most.

In the next section we use the results from the above in our customer contact approach. Getting appointments.

NLP Sales Section Index

Recommended Sales Books

NLP Sales 1: Introduction
NLP Sales 2: Customers buying cycle
NLP Sales 3: Questions to identify your initial problem and value statements
NLP Sales 4: Getting appointments (framework script)
NLP Sales 5: Handling classic and specific objections when getting appointments
NLP Sales 6: Handling other objections when getting appointments
NLP Sales 7: Advancing the sale
NLP Sales 8: Closing
NLP Sales 9: Value, proposals and negotiation
NLP Sales 10: Implementation, case studies, referrals and testimonials
NLP Sales 11: New Media
NLP Sales 12: NLP approaches that make the difference.

 

Problem and value statements

Problem and value statements